Monday, May 24, 2010

Cornix et Canis (DeFuria)

SOURCE: This comes from the Latin translation that accompanies De Furia's edition of the Greek Aesopic corpus, published in 1810 and available at GoogleBooks. This is fable 251 in De Furia; for other versions, see Perry 127.

READ OUT LOUD. Choose which marked text you prefer to practice with - macrons or accent marks - and read the text out loud until you feel comfortable and confident. Then, try reading the unmarked text at the bottom. It should be easy for you after practicing with the marked texts. :-)


MACRONS. Here is the text with macrons:

Cum Cornix Minervae sacrificāret, Canem ad epulum invitāvit. At ille, Quid frustrā, inquit, haec in sacrificium absūmis? Dea enim adeō tē ōdit, ut tibi unī, ex tuī generis avibus, auguriī fidem dētraxerit. Cui Cornix, Idcirco, ait, magis illī sacrificō, ut mihi tandem reconciliētur.


ACCENT MARKS. Here is the text with accent marks, plus some color-coding for the words of three or more syllables (blue: penultimate stress; red: antepenultimate stress):

Cum Cornix Minérvae sacrificáret, Canem ad épulum invitávit. At ille, Quid frustra, inquit, haec in sacrifícium absúmis? Dea enim ádeo te odit, ut tibi uni, ex tui géneris ávibus, augúrii fidem detráxerit. Cui Cornix, Idcírco, ait, magis illi sacrífico, ut mihi tandem reconciliétur.


UNMARKED TEXT. Here is the unmarked text - after practicing with the marked text that you prefer, you should not have any trouble with the unmarked text:

Cum Cornix
Minervae sacrificaret,
Canem
ad epulum invitavit.
At ille,
Quid frustra, inquit,
haec
in sacrificium absumis?
Dea enim
adeo te odit,
ut tibi uni,
ex tui generis avibus,
augurii fidem detraxerit.
Cui Cornix,
Idcirco, ait,
magis illi
sacrifico,
ut mihi
tandem reconcilietur.



Here is an illustration from the Medici Aesop, which is online at the New York Public Library website.




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