Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Hercules et Pulicis Morsus (Camerarius)

SOURCE: Fabulae Aesopicae by the great 16th-century scholar Ioachim Camerarius in a 1702 reprint at GoogleBooks. This is number 61 in the collection. For more information and other versions of this fable, see the links list for Perry 231.

READ OUT LOUD. Choose which marked text you prefer to practice with - macrons or accent marks - and read the text out loud until you feel comfortable and confident. Then, try reading the unmarked text at the bottom. It should be easy for you after practicing with the marked texts. :-)


MACRONS. Here is the text with macrons:

Cum īnsiluisset pūlex in pedem cuiusdam, ille ad opprimendum hunc Herculem invocāvit. Sed cum pūlex sē illinc mox saltū subdūxisset, cum gemitū ille: Hercules, inquit, quid egō abs tē opis in magnīs perīculīs expectem, quī contrā pūlicem adesse mihi nōluistī?


ACCENT MARKS. Here is the text with ecclesiastical accents, plus some color-coding for the words of three or more syllables (blue: penultimate stress; red: antepenultimate stress):

Cum insiluísset pulex in pedem cuiúsdam, ille ad oppriméndum hunc Hérculem invocávit. Sed cum pulex se illinc mox saltu subduxísset, cum gémitu ille: Hércules, inquit, quid ego abs te opis in magnis perículis expéctem, qui contra púlicem adésse mihi noluísti?


UNMARKED TEXT. Here is the unmarked text - after practicing with the marked text that you prefer, you should not have any trouble with the unmarked text:

Cum insiluisset pulex
in pedem cuiusdam,
ille
ad opprimendum hunc
Herculem invocavit.
Sed cum pulex
se illinc mox saltu subduxisset,
cum gemitu ille:
Hercules, inquit,
quid ego abs te opis
in magnis periculis expectem,
qui
contra pulicem adesse mihi
noluisti?



IMAGE. Here is an illustration for the story (image source) showing Hercules:




No comments:

Post a Comment