Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Formicae et Cicada (Morris)

SOURCE: A Latin Reading-Book by Charles D'Urban Morris (1873) at GoogleBooks. For more information and other versions, see the links list for Perry 373.

NoDictionaries.com: You can find the word list for this fable online, and use it interactively (here are some tips on how to make best use of the tool).

READ OUT LOUD. Choose which marked text you prefer to practice with - macrons or accent marks - and read the text out loud until you feel comfortable and confident. Then, try reading the unmarked text at the bottom. It should be easy for you after practicing with the marked texts. :-)


MACRONS. Here is the text with macrons:

Formīcae frūgēs per hiemem hūmectātās siccābant. Hās adit cicāda ēsuriens et rogat, paululum cibī ut sibi impertiant. Cuī illae, Aestāte, inquiunt, quaerere tē oportuit. Nōn vacābat, inquit cicāda. Quid faciēbās igitur? Cantātiōnibus operam dabam, inquit. Tum illae, Sī cecinistī, inquiunt, aestāte, hieme saltātō.



ACCENT MARKS. Here is the text with ecclesiastical accents, plus some color-coding for the words of three or more syllables (blue: penultimate stress; red: antepenultimate stress):

Formícae fruges per híemem humectátas siccábant. Has adit cicáda esúriens et rogat, paúlulum cibi ut sibi impértiant. Cui illae, Aestáte, ínquiunt, quaérere te opórtuit. Non vacábat, inquit cicáda. Quid faciébas ígitur? Cantatiónibus óperam dabam, inquit. Tum illae, Si cecinísti, ínquiunt, aestáte, híeme saltáto.



UNMARKED TEXT. Here is the unmarked text - after practicing with the marked text that you prefer, you should not have any trouble with the unmarked text:

Formicae
fruges per hiemem humectatas
siccabant.
Has adit
cicada esuriens
et rogat,
paululum cibi
ut sibi impertiant.
Cui illae,
"Aestate (inquiunt)
quaerere te oportuit."
"Non vacabat,"
inquit cicada.
"Quid faciebas igitur?"
"Cantationibus operam dabam,"
inquit.
Tum illae,
"Si cecinisti (inquiunt) aestate,
hieme saltato.
"



IMAGE. Here is an illustration for the story (image source), by Arthur Rackham:


Here is another illustration from the Medici Aesop, which is online at the New York Public Library website.

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